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Faculty / Librarian Collaboration Toolkit: Publishing and Scholarship

Investigate and support best practices in faculty and librarian collaboration to more effectively meet local institution and library missions and serve the campus community.

Publishing and Scholarship

Publishing Resources

Scholarship and Supporting Faculty Research Resources

With substantial changes in academic publishing models, as well as changing dynamics in research projects, faculty are collaborating more and more with librarians in publishing and scholarship. Alternative publishing systems set within libraries, including institutional repositories, library-based university presses, and open educational resources, are appealing to faculty because of their “solid infrastructure” of metadata development, rights management, and cost savings. As competent colleagues who do not pose a threat in the competitive arena of tenure and promotion, librarians serve as effective research partners and co-investigators.

Survey

What are librarians doing well?

PALNI is actively developing the following publishing and scholarship resources for faculty:

Institutional repositories: CONTENTdm and IslandDora

Library-based university press: PALNIPress instances of Open Journal Systems, Open Monograph Press, and Open Conference Systems

Open educational resources: PALSave

Librarian scholarship: RIO Scholarly Writing Group

What can librarians improve on?

Many of the tools listed for publishing and scholarship are new and still unfamiliar to many faculty. For example, faculty may be aware of open educational resources, but not aware of the PALSave program. Along with library directors giving awareness of these tools to provost and deans, Librarians should utilize their liaison duties to promote these services with faculty.

What surprises us?

When asked "In what ways have a librarian contacted you in an attempt to learn more about your teaching and research interests?" the top response given by faculty at 25% was to attend departmental engagements outside of library hours. This was greater than invitations out to coffee/lunch or emails with articles of personal interest.

Key Findings

  1. Historically librarians have collaborated with faculty in publishing and scholarship by providing reference / research assistance and access to resources.
  2. Today librarians are collaborating with faculty by providing tools for new publishing models (institutional repositories, library-based university presses), developing open educational resources, and serving as research partners.
  3. The “solid infrastructure” in library based publishing tools (with metadata development, rights management, and long term support) is attractive to faculty.
  4. “Service vs. servitude” tensions with faculty exist about the specific roles of librarians.
  5. Librarians are seen as competent and safe colleagues to collaborate with on research projects.

Literature Review

Bedi, S., & Walde, C. (2017). Transforming Roles: Canadian Academic Librarians Embedded in Faculty Research Projects. College & Research Libraries, 78(3), 314–327. https://doi.org/10.5860/crl.78.3.314
Bright, K. M. (2018). Examining the Role of Liaison Librarians as Research Collaboration Partners: A Mixed-Methods Multiple-Case Study.
Donlan, R., Stanislaw, S., & Fernandez, M. (2017). The Future of Information Literacy in the Library: An Example of Librarian/Publisher Collaboration. Serials Librarian, 72(1–4), 91–94. https://doi.org/10.1080/0361526X.2017.1297589
Ellis, L. (2019, March 1). A Lesson From UC’s Split With Elsevier: Keep the Faculty in the Loop. The Chronicle of Higher Education. Retrieved from https://www.chronicle.com/article/A-Lesson-From-UC-s-Split/245811
Goodsett, M., Loomis, B., & Miles, M. (2016). Leading campus OER initiatives through library–faculty collaboration. College & Undergraduate Libraries, 23(3), 335–342.
Keener, A. (2015). The arrival fallacy: collaborative research relationships in the digital humanities. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 9(2). Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/117503
Klain-Gabbay, L., & Shoham, S. (2016). Scholarly communication and academic librarians. Library & Information Science Research, 38(2), 170–179.
Rawls, M. M. (2015). Looking for Links: How Faculty Research Productivity Correlates with Library Investment and Why Electronic Library Materials Matter Most. Evidence Based Library & Information Practice, 10(2), 34–44. https://doi.org/10.18438/B89C70

Suggested Actions

  1. Maintain reference / research assistance and access to resources, as this remains a key piece of collaborating with faculty in publishing and scholarship.
  2. Seek new in-roads to faculty by promoting institutional repositories, library-based university presses, and developing open educational resources.
  3. Consider serving as a co-investigator with faculty on research projects.
  4. Be aware of continuing “service vs. servitude” tensions with faculty exist about the specific roles of librarians.

Best Practices

1. Maintain reference / research assistance and access to resources, as this remains a key piece of collaborating with faculty in publishing and scholarship.

2. Seek new in-roads to faculty by promoting institutional repositories, library-based university presses, and developing open educational resources.

3. Consider serving as a co-investigator with faculty on research projects.

4. Be aware of continuing “service vs. servitude” tensions with faculty exist about the specific roles of librarians.